U.S. Government Evidence Summit on Protecting Children Outside of Family Care

Dec 12, 2011 |

About the Summit

Children in the most dire straits are those outside of family care - those living on the streets or in institutions, trafficked, participating in armed groups, or exploited for their labor. Children in such circumstances often experience abuse, neglect, lack of stimulation, and extreme and toxic stress - all of which have a profoundly negative impact on a child's development and adult outcomes.

Recognizing that all governments need evidence to inform efficacious, effective, and sustainable policies, strategies, and programs to care for vulnerable children, the U.S. Government convened an Evidence Summit on Protecting Children Outside of Family Care on December 12-13, 2011 in Washington, D.C. The Summit brought together leading researchers as well as technical experts to assess the evidence to inform policies, strategies and programs relevant to protecting children outside of family care in lower- and middle-income countries and identify evidence gaps to shape the future research agenda.

Outcomes

Outcomes from the Summit included:

  1. Clarity on evidence to inform policies, strategies and programs relevant to protecting children outside of family care; and
  2. identification of evidence gaps to shape the U.S. government research agenda.
The Summit led to the establishment of programming principles for U.S. government assistance to children outside of family care. An evidence-to-action strategy [PDF, 2.6KB] was developed following the Summit to ensure application of the principles, implement evidence-based best practices, and address critical knowledge gaps in U.S. government-funded initiatives.

Summit Evidence

Summit participants, including leading researchers, practitioners and policy makers, worked together to review the evidence pertaining to children outside of family care and summarized the findings in a special issue of Child Abuse and Neglect: The International Journal. On the basis of these findings and other research, the Action Plan was developed by an interagency team under the leadership of the U.S. Government Special Advisor for Children in Adversity and cleared by OMB.

Read evidence from the summit in these articles from the Journal of Child Abuse and Neglect:

These articles were taken from the Elsevier International Journal of Child Abuse and Neglect.

Resources

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